Let's not normalize the pain

Miguel Del Amo 12/05/2020 260
Behind each deceased there's a family, some friends. Let's not get used to the horror
Good health, friends of Onda Layetana.
 
Let's not normalize pain.
 
It's true that we have to be positive. What's more, doctors say that we must do it, because being positive helps us make defenses, making more difficult for diseases to infect us, for example, as is the case of this damn virus that is affecting everyone.
 
But let's not fall into the ridiculous. What I want to say today is that we don't have to normalize pain, no matter how positive we think. There are people who were more concerned when there were 900 positives in Spain than when 900 people died every day.
 
In the end it's self-defense, right? You have to stop receiving news, I understand, but we don't have to normalize the pain, even if we see the light at the end of the tunnel because... there are still deceased in Spain.
 
It has been decided not to show the coffins, not to make a show of the deceased ... it's a decision, but they are there.
 
For example, when we can go outside, and we can go to the beach, for example. Imagine if you live in Barcelona city and say 'well, we are going to the coast, we are going to Castelldefels'. Then go there, Castelldefels and you say 'oops, this beach is very full, it's normal, people was eager to'. You continue, you go on to Sitges, passing of course the slopes of Garraf or the tolls, because Catalonia is like this and it will continue like this, uh? It costs a little money to go to the beach to enjoy a day off. But Sitges, when you arrive is also full. And you say: 'Well, we are going to do ten more kilometers'.
 
Well, all that driving course imagine the coffins. Imagine those coffins along the way, coffin after coffin, coffins in a row, a row of coffins ...
 
Well, those are the people who have died, only in Spain, for now.
 
And those people to whom we are not paying tribute, the relatives have not been able to say goodbye, the president doesn't even put on a black tie, there has not been a minute of silence on the part of the government ... but by other autonomous communities and municipalities , etc.
 
But with that eagerness of the government to avoid the news, people who have lost family or friends are forgotten, and they are people who have a first and last name, and I'm going to tell them about me, not because I want to highlight nor want anyone to give me their condolences but as an example.
 
This week one of my brothers-in-law died, and he had a name and surname, a healthy person before starting this madness, this pandemic, and he had a name and surname. My sister who has been widowed also has a first and last name. You don't know her name, but the surname is mine, it's Del Amo. My nephew who has been orphaned also has a first and last name.
 
And they are people who have not been able to say goodbye to their husband, their father, nor can I hug my sister and my nephew in this case, because we are all confined.
 
It's ONE case, because unfortunately there are many more in Spain, and we don't know if they are 23,000, they are 30,000, 40,000 ... they are too many. Too many.
 
And when we finally go out, behind each case there's a family, there are some friends, and I don't know what we will do, if we ask for responsibilities ... that is, we'll vote better. Surely we will.
 
But now what we want is respect. We want our leaders to be understood when they speak, to give directions, not to blame the population.
 
A little respect. We don't want press conferences where they don't know what an ERTE is. Where there's messing around. Where a minister like Ávalos (minister by accident, I don't understand how that person can be a minister) says that we have always been able to go out with the children.
 
We're being teased a little bit and I think we don't deserve that. And I'm not blaming anyone, but I think that people who have stopped having someone they love are not being treated with respect.
 
We are still reflecting positively here.
 
My condolences to all the people who are having a hard time and alone.
 
Good health to everybody.